Interview with T.L. Bodine and Tagestraum!

Today I’m interviewing author T.L. Bodine. First let’s take a look at her latest book: Tagestraum.

Working as a child welfare agent, Adrian has seen a lot of disturbing things. Nathaniel Weaver isn’t the first kid in the city who’s ever gone missing, but his disappearance haunts Adrian in a way he cannot entirely explain. Maybe it’s because the child looks so eerily similar to himself. Maybe it’s the drawing that Nathaniel gave to him the last time they met: a cloaked nightmarish figure that Adrian recognizes from his own dreams.

When Adrian returns once more to the scene of the disappearance, he finds a doorway leading to another world: Tagestraum, a bizarre and often treacherous faerie realm powered by human dreams. The world itself threatens the safety and sanity of any human that crosses into it, and several of its denizens are eager to harvest errant humans for a little raw energy.

Adrian knows that he’s the only person who can find Nathaniel – but to do it, he must battle both dangerous inhabitants and his own worst nightmares, and each night that passes brings Adrian closer to losing himself completely.

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1.     So much of your writing has a fairy-tale element. What fairy tales captivated you as a child, and now?

When I was maybe six or seven, my grandmother gave me a book of fairytales that were broken out into days — 365 sections, each one meant to be read at bedtime throughout the year.  These were the original Grimm’s stories, and I was completely fascinated by the violence and death in them compared to the Disney movies I’d seen.  The one that really stuck with me was Cinderella, when the step sisters are cutting off parts of their foot to fit in the slipper.  I just remember reading it and thinking, “Wow, they definitely left that part out of the movie.  This is so much cooler!” (I was kind of a weird kid lol)

In college, I read The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter, and it was kind of a transformative experience.  I knew right then that I wanted to revisit some of those stories from my childhood and try seeing them in a new way.

2.     What do you find the biggest differences are between writing fiction and web content?

They’re almost like apples and oranges.  When you’re writing for the web, you’re giving somebody exactly what they want.  Your number one job is figuring exactly what they’re looking for and delivering it to them.  You spend a lot of time researching and creatively reorganizing information into an effective or accessible format, but everything you need already exists — you’re just packaging it differently.   With fiction, you’re creating things as you go, and you have to go slowly enough to figure out what you’re trying to say.  I can write 10k a day easy for my “day job”, but if I get a thousand words out on a novel it’s a very good day.

3.     If one song out there could define your book, what would it be?

Is it cheating to use a poem?  Because I’d totally say “The Stolen Child” by W.B. Yeats.  Some people have done musical arrangements of it, so it totally counts right?

4.     If you met your main character at a bar, how would you interact?

Well first off I’d be pretty concerned because he’s not a drinker.  He watched both of his parents drink entirely too much and ruin a large chunk of his childhood because of it.  He toyed with drinking socially in college and realized he couldn’t control himself around it, so he’s never been back since.

But I’d buy him a Shirley Temple or something — dude’s earned it– and try to get him to open up.   Sure, I have the unfair advantage of knowing him better than he knows me, but I’m sure there’s things he hasn’t told me yet and I’d love to know them.

5.     If you could live in any literary universe, which would it be?

I’d be perfectly content with a Hogwarts acceptance letter 🙂

6.     Are you a plotter or a pantser?

A bit of both.  Writing for me is kind of like driving on the highway at night.  You know pretty much where you’re going and how you’re going to get there, but at any given time all you can see is what’s right in front of you, and sometimes things jump out at you from nowhere.  Only difference is that writing, the unexpected bits are usually good.

7.     How has writing changed your life?

I’ve been making up stories since I can remember, and writing them down since I was about 8, so it’s been a huge part of making me who I am now.  There’s kind of an old cliche about writing as therapy, but I think there’s a lot of truth to it.  Obviously the number one thing you want to do when you write a book is to try and tell a good story.  But underneath that, you’re also working out problems — trying to figure out how the world works, and why, and whether that’s a good thing.  So I think writing can give you a lot of self-awareness in that respect, and it’s something I turn to for comfort in those situations where answers aren’t always easy to find.

8.     What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

Read widely.  Write all the time.  But don’t forget to go outside and live, too.  Every experience you have will enrich your writing, and you owe it to yourself to gather as many of those experiences as you possibly can.  Sitting alone in front of a typewriter is a romantic image, maybe, but it’s not what’s going to make you a better writer.
About the Author
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T.L. Bodine is a fantasy author, web content writer and fly-by-night video game writer.  Most recently, she’s collaborated with Ginger Goat on the anthology “Trust Me,” about dolls who sometimes tell lies, and her work can be seen in the newly released Holdfast gamebook from Black Chicken Studios.  She has three books in print: Tagestraum, Nezumi’s Children, and The Beast in the Bedchamber.

Interview with @Georgia_McBride and Her Fantastic Novel Praefatio & Giveaway!

Today I have the distinct pleasure to host an interview with author and publisher extrordinaire, Georgia McBride! Her novel, Praefatio, has just released, and it is fantastic (if I do say so myself). Review to come.

About the Book

PRAEFATIO Cover

The story of 17-year-old Grace Ann Miller is that of no ordinary runaway. Touching upon topics such as mental illness, teen pregnancy, and the relationship between victims and abductors, this is Grace’s account of weeks on the run, falling in love, and losing everything but her faith. After being missing for weeks, Grace turns up on the estate of international rock star Gavin Vault, half-dressed and yelling for help. Over the course of 24 hours, she holds an entire police force captive with incredulous tales of angels, demons, and war, intent on saving Gavin from lockup and her family from worry over her safety. Instead, authorities believe that Grace is ill, the victim of assault and suffering from a severely fractured mind as a result of Stockholm Syndrome. Undeterred, Grace reveals the secret existence of dark angels on Earth, an ancient prophecy, and a wretched curse steeped in biblical myth. Her claims set into motion an ages-old war, pitting sister against brother and light versus darkness, resulting in blood, death, and the loss of everything that matters. Faced with corrupt police officers, eager doctors, and accusing journalists, Grace must convince all of them that her delusions are actually the truth, with nothing but her word as proof.

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I had the chance to bombard Georgia with questions 😉

You wear so many hats. How do you manage to fit in all of the awesome work you do?

GM:  I’m pretty sure I’m failing miserably. I don’t sleep much, I eat very unhealthy things at odd hours and I get frequent headaches. That said, I try to dedicate one day/weekly to YALitChat – and that’s Wednesdays. The rest of the time is dedicated to being a publisher and author.

What was the first plot bunny that inspired Praefatio?

GM: They all came at one time – the girl with the incredulous story, the boy accused of unspeakable crimes and the incident that would change everything we believe.

If one song out there could define your book, what would it be?

GM: I listened to a ton of 30 Seconds to Mars while writing this book. I think A Beautiful Lie kind of sums it up though.

If you met your main character at a bar, how would you interact?

GM: First, I would be all fan girl and crazy. I know it. I have a major literary crush on Grace Ann Miller. I would be like, “Hey Girl. I created you. Don’t you love all those amazing kissing scenes I wrote for you?”

If you could live in any literary universe, which would it be?

GM: Wow. That’s a tough one. I think I would like to perhaps live in the world Delirium. Love hurts so much sometimes. People kill when they can’t have it. We wouldn’t have that problem.

Are you a plotter or a pantser?

GM:I hate plotting. Not gonna lie.

How has writing changed your life?

GM: Writing has brought be a wonderful community of people who are supportive. It has also afforded me the opportunity to do something I love – writing and publishing. It’s really been a blessing to me and many others.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

GM: Just write. Don’t worry about what others are writing or doing. Just write.

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About the Author

Goergia McBride Photo

Georgia McBride is the founder of Month9Books, which publishes speculative fiction for teens and tweens, and YALITCHAT.ORG, a nonprofit organization fostering the advancement of young adult literature worldwide. She lives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Book Links: Goodreads Barnes And Noble

Author Links: WebsiteFacebook PageTwitterPinterest

Month9Books: WebsiteBlogger CentralFacebookTwitterPinterestGoodreads
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Enter HERE for a giveaway of Praefatio!

Cover Reveal! Endre, Book 2 in the Elsker Saga by @STbende ST Bende

Endre

 

Gorgeous cover!

About The Book

Sometimes, finding your destiny means doing the exact
opposite of what The Fates have planned.

Winning the heart of an immortal assassin was a dream come true for Kristia
Tostenson. Now she’s knee deep in wedding plans, goddess lessons, and stolen
kisses. But her decision to become immortal could end in heartbreak — not only
for Kristia, but for the god who loves her. Because while Ull would do anything
to protect his bride, even the God of Winter is powerless against the Norse
apocalypse. Ragnarok is coming. And the gods aren’t even close to ready.

About The Author

Before finding domestic bliss in suburbia, ST Bende lived in Manhattan Beach (became overly fond of Peet’s Coffee) and Europe… where she became overly fond of the musical Cats. Her love of Scandinavian culture and a very patient Norwegian teacher inspired the ELSKER series. She hopes her characters make you smile and that one day pastries will be considered a health food.

 ST Bende

You can follow ST Bende on Twitter @stbende, or send an e-mail to stbende@gmail.com.

 

Blog: http://stbende.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/stbende

Twitter: https://twitter.com/stbende or @stbende

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/stbende/

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Didn’t Catch Book One?

ELSKER200x300-3

ELSKER

Kristia Tostenson prefers Earl Grey to Grey Goose and book clubs to nightclubs, but when she transfers from her one-stoplight town to Cardiff University in Wales she falls in love with Ull Myhr. Her new boyfriend isn’t exactly what she was expecting. He’s an honest-to-goodness Norse God — an immortal assassin fated to die at Ragnarok, the battle destined to destroy Asgard and Earth. Kristia’s crazy visions are the only thing that can save their realms.

Her orderly life just got very messy.

Trailer

Amazon

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

Entranced

Interview with @STbende ST Bende and her book ELSKER plus excerpt!

I’m so excited to present to you today my interview with ST Bende about her book ELSKER!

ELSKER200x300-3

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Thanks so much for letting me visit today, Lindsay.  As a debut author, it’s been fantastic to be embraced by such a lovely group of bloggers.  Y’all have been so gracious!

ELSKER, Book One in THE ELSKER SAGA, follows twenty-year-old Kristia Tostenson as she leaves her small town to find adventure at Cardiff University in Wales.  Kristia gets a lot more than she bargained for when she falls in love with Ull Myhr.  He’s not just a graduate student – he’s an Asgardian Assassin and the Norse God of Winter.  Kristia’s orderly life is about to get seriously complicated.

 Interview

Being a Finn, I love Scandinavian mythology. What part of your research was the most fun?

Hei hei!  The mythology is fantastic, isn’t it?  It’s so complex, with nine realms and scores of creatures, and it’s so, so dark.  There’s just so much to work with.  Researching the myths might have been my favorite part of writing Elsker.  I read every book I could find at our little library, including the kids books.  (Note to whoever’s in charge of marketing Scandinavian mythology to kids: you might want to scale back on some of the gruesome illustrations.  Just sayin’.  Who knew trolls were so scary?)

It was important to me to develop a male lead most people hadn’t heard of, so I didn’t do much reading on Thor, Odin and the lot.  And although the God of Winter is pretty popular with skiers (did you know there’s an Ull Festival in Colorado?  I’d love to go one day!), most people aren’t familiar with him.  I knew Ull was my guy when my library got a textbook written by a Scandinavian Studies professor.  It was over three hundred pages long, with only a paragraph-long mention of Ull.  He was pretty much a scholarly blank page, and I couldn’t wait to create his back-story.

 

 How does Elsker push the envelope for fantasy?

Although there are plenty of stories about Greek gods interacting with mortals, there aren’t a ton of YA/NA books that focus on Scandinavian mythology.  Asgard is a radically different world from Mt. Olympus, and the existence of the nine realms opens up a slew of potential bad guys and allies.  The Greeks have their Hydra and Titans, but we’ve got Jotuns, Dark Elves, Trolls, and these visionary Norns.  And bringing it all to Midgard (Earth), and seeing it through the eyes of a girl whose frame of reference is a 300 person town with one stoplight… well, in that context, the mythological Norse world just seems even crazier.  As a writer, it was a dream to have so many types of characters to play with.  And as a reader, hopefully it’s a journey that’s different than anything you’ve seen before.

 If one song out there could define your book, what would it be?

It’s Time, by Imagine Dragons.  My small town girl and my Norse god are literally from two different worlds.  Kristia’s future is unwritten, and she moves to Wales for a fresh start.  Ull comes from a world where his destiny was set at birth, and he feels powerless over his fate. “I get a little bit bigger but then I admit, I’m just the same as I was.  Now don’t you understand?  I’m never changing who I am.”  Ull would love to feel like he could change the future, but he believes he’s on a predestined course he has to follow.  And Kristia’s going to do everything she can to show him he’s wrong.

 If you met your main character at a bar, how would you interact?

If I met Ull in real life I would giggle uncontrollably, turn bright red, ask to take a picture with him, blurt out “I love you” like the grown-up that I am, then run the other way.

If you could live in any literary universe, which would it be?

I’d enroll at Hogwarts and hang out with Ron, Hermione and Harry.  I would totally be a Gryffindor, and Hermione and I could share our obsessively detailed class notes.  On weekends we’d stuff our faces at Honeydukes, though I would never, ever try a Bertie Botts Every Flavored Bean.  Ever.

I got to meet Gary Oldman when he was promoting Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and while all the other adults asked him savvy questions about his illustrious acting career, I shoved my Harry Potter book at him and begged for an autograph.  He signed it “Gary Oldman/Sirius B.”  It’s one of my most prized possessions.

 Are you a plotter or a pantser?

A pantser.  Since I wrote Elsker for myself, I didn’t really think much about where it was going or how it would flow.  I just sat at the keyboard and waited to see what would happen.  I wrote the scenes I wanted to as I thought of them, then went back and pieced them together.  It made for some crazy storylines, not all of which made the final cut, but it was really fun.

 How has writing changed your life?

Writing lets me purge my creative energy.  It’s something I can do on my own, whenever I have the time, and there aren’t any rules.  It’s a fantastic release.  Getting to share Elsker with the world is really scary, but it’s also the first time I’ve gotten to introduce my imaginary friends to anyone else.  And that’s exciting.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

I’ll be honest, I’ve never really thought of myself as a writer.  It’s just something I love doing, for me.  And if you love something, you shouldn’t let anything stop you from doing it.  Don’t worry about whether what you’re doing is marketable, or whether you’ll ever get an agent or a publishing deal.  Just do what you love, and take pride in knowing that you are pursuing your passion.

That said, if publication is your goal, a good critique partner is invaluable.  I’m such a huge fan of mine, we recently wrote a YA project together.  We had a blast.  *Waves* Hi, Jacque!

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THE ELSKER SAGA is available now from Entranced Publishing.

TUR, the prequel, can be downloaded for free at http://www.entrancedpublishing.com/imprints-2/blush/elsker/

ELSKER, Book 1, is available from Entranced, Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Find ST Bende on Twitter : @STBende

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/stbende

or at (http://stbende.blogspot.com/).

And be sure to stop by http://stbende.blogspot.com/ between April 11th and May 20th to enter to win fabulous prizes in the ELSKER Release Month of Giveaways!

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BONUS Excerpt!

ELSKER – Book 1, THE ELSKER SAGA

At eight o’clock, a firm knock interrupted my reading.  I picked my way through the flower shop that our living room had become and opened the door.

“Oh good, you kept my peace offerings.”  Ull treated me to a rakish grin.

“Just a few of them,” I muttered.  “Come on in.”

“Oh, no.  You must come with me.”

“Why?”  I challenged.  Ull sighed.

“Are you going to fight me at every turn?”

“Probably.”

“Please come.”  He looked so adorable standing on my stoop, his scarf casually thrown across the grey sweater under his coat.  I gave in quicker than I meant to.

“Fine.”  I grabbed my coat from the closet by the door and shoved my keys and wallet into the pocket.  “Where are we off to?”  I closed the door behind me and followed Ull into the brisk night, waiting for his promised explanation.

But he didn’t say anything.  Instead, he put his hand on the small of my back and guided me away from campus.  I shivered and noticed that Ull wore his jacket open, at ease in the chill.  As we rounded the corner, Ull dropped his hand to clasp mine.  It was so warm, so strong, and for a moment I forgot to be mad at him.  We walked in silence as he led me down the main road.  After two right turns, I found myself standing in a quiet garden.

Ull had brought me to a church.

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Interview with Jack Croxall @jackcroxall Author of Tethers

I am so excited to introduce you all to Jack Croxall, if you haven’t met him already. His book, Tethers, is totally fantastic and a wonderful, well-written read. I love it.

A bit about his book:

In the wake of a cold Victorian winter, two teenagers discover an anonymous journal filled with strange passages and bizarre scribblings.

The journal soon draws them into a covert and sinister conspiracy, a conspiracy centred around an otherworldly artefact with the power to change everything …

Karl and Esther have spent almost every day of their thirteen years in the quiet market town of Shraye. Stifled by their rural surroundings and frustrated by their unfulfilled ambitions, they find the allure of the journal’s mysterious pages impossible to ignore. The book seems to be beckoning them away from Shraye, away from their homes and towards the coast where an unsolved disappearance has set in motion a dark chain of events.

The voyage the teenagers soon find themselves undertaking is one of desperate importance and true peril; it will change the way they see the world, and each other, forever.

Set in Victorian Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire, Tethers is the first instalment of The Tethers Trilogy.

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Here’s my interview with Jack:

How much work did you put into building your world?

On the whole, Tethers took about two years to write and a good proportion of that time was spent researching Victorian England (where the novel is set). I spent hours upon hours studying Victorian life and I must say it was fascinating, not a chore in the slightest! My favourite aspect was perhaps life on the waterways – a style of living that is non-existent in today’s society. Whole families would live in the single cramped cabin of a narrowboat as they transported supplies up and down the rivers and canals. The life was incredibly tough and children would work full days as soon as they could walk.

What was the initial lightbulb idea that put Tethers into motion?

 

I started writing Tethers with absolutely no (conscious) plan whatsoever, and, at times, I did wonder where the novel was going. However, my lightbulb moment came when I realised the aspect of the plot that the book’s title is a reference to. I couldn’t possibly go into any more detail than that though …

What was the single hardest scene to write in the book?

 

There is a scene where a main character dies and that was incredibly difficult to write, not only because it’s horrible to let one of your darlings go, but you have to accurately gauge and convey all the emotions at play in the other characters present. It took several redrafts but I think I got there in the end!

If one song out there could define your book, what would it be?

 

I really can’t think of just one song, but I have put together a playlist of songs I listened to whilst writing the book. You can check it out here: http://bit.ly/Zr6l9U

If you met your main character at a bar, how would you interact?

 

One of my main characters, Esther, lives in a rural pub and I think if I somehow turned up there, she would be quite keen to talk to a new face. She’d probably be disappointed when she found out I wasn’t particularly exciting or mysterious though – unless she found out I was from the future of course!

If you could live in any literary universe, which would it be?

Oh, that’s easy; Lyra’s universe in His Dark Materials. Philip Pullman crafted a gorgeous world for his seminal trilogy and the best part is that everybody gets their own daemon (a physical, animal-embodiment of your soul). I think mine would be a heron because I’m patient, persistent and I love water!

Are you a plotter or a pantser?

 

Can I be a combination of the two, a ‘planster’ perhaps? I’ve recently been writing with a vague plan but allowing myself absolute freedom to go off on tangents and connect the dots however I feel is best at the time. It’s working out well actually.

How has writing changed your life?

 

Quite simply, it’s made me happier than ever before.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

Firstly, I would say read as widely as you can – not exclusively books from the genre you intend to write in. I’m not only talking about fiction either; blogs, newspaper articles, pamphlets, menus, billboards, DVD boxes, E-mails, all can be sources of great writing – you need to absorb as much of it as you can. Secondly, I suggest getting involved with the larger writing community. With social networking it’s never been easier and most writers and readers really are wonderfully supportive. I’ve found talking to fellow bookish-types incredibly helpful so, get involved; my twitter handle is @JackCroxall, if you’re interested, add me for a chat!

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Find Tethers here:

 

More About Jack Croxall:

 

Jack Croxall - Author Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Website

Twitter

Interview with #Author Sharon Sant @sharonsant

I am so pleased to host an interview of author Sharon Sant and promote her novel Sky Song today.

A little about Sky Song:

skyson

 

Sky song is a novel that brought me immediately back to the excitement of being ten years old and reading the Dark is Rising trilogy. Jacob, a teen with mood-ring eyes, discovers that he’s something entirely different than human, and that he’s tasked with the great responsibility of being the next Watcher. Throw in an adorable since-childhood threesome who start to discover their more adult feelings for each other, and some fantastic other-worldly conflict, and Sky Song becomes a fulfilling, compelling read with the promise of an exciting trilogy.

I had the privilege of interviewing the author, Sharon Sant.

 

What was your inspiration for writing Sky Song?

 

Sky Song started off as a younger children’s tale about a girl whose father watched the skies every night for something.  I don’t even remember now what sparked off the initial idea.  Sometimes it can be a throwaway comment, a song lyric, a seemingly innocuous thing.  Only the other day an idea for a book came to me from a random comment made on Twitter!

 

The little girl in my story didn’t know what her father watched for, but it soon became clear to her that whatever it was, it didn’t belong to the world she was familiar with. As I thought about it, though, the idea seemed to morph independently, into something completely different.  The main character became a fifteen-year-old boy instead of a young girl.  I started to think about what could come from the starry heavens.  My first answer was aliens, but, for me, that was too obvious.  Then I got to thinking about all the various belief systems that have stuck with humanity over the years of its evolution, and the one recurring theme was that the stars are linked with our destinies.  But what sort of destiny could come from the sky?  Cue aliens again!  And what would you do if your destiny called but you didn’t want it?  That’s the story at the heart of Sky Song.

 

What can we look forward to for The Young Moon?

 

At the end of Sky Song, we left Jacob **Sound of a truck roaring past** so, The Young Moon picks up two years on from there. There was always going to be three books and each one continues the overall story arc. Sky Song was as much about Jacob’s dilemma over his life choices as it was about his battle with the bad guy.  In The Young Moon there’s a whole bunch of different dilemmas around loyalties and who gets to choose who lives and who dies.  Jacob gets faced with some really tough decisions and quite often has to deal with the consequences of making the wrong ones. Aside from that, The Young Moon is a quest story, essentially; Jacob needs to find something before Makash does; if you’ve already read Sky Song, you’ll have a pretty good idea what that is!

 

 

Quick! Your top three favourite books!

 

The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly, Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by good ol’ JK.

 

Ask me tomorrow and they’ll change, though!

 

 What are your thoughts on the current state of books and Indie Publishing?

 

I think it’s the most exciting time there has ever been for Indie publishing.  I think if you’re prepared to work hard and have a little luck on your side, you can achieve things now as an indie that have never been possible before.  The biggest change is the Kindle platform, of course.  I love that because it kicks the backsides of vanity publishers and other system abusers by giving authors a choice. And authors also have a choice now about whether they want to even bother trying to get a traditional deal. I know lots of indie authors who make a good living from self-publishing and are not interested in working any other way.  I have another novel coming out through a fairly small publisher (though they are awesome) in June, so I’m not just saying that as a self-published author with no insight into traditional publishing, I’m saying it because there should be a level playing field for those who are able to play it.   Having said that, I do feel that there has to be a place for traditional publishing as well, the books they produce must be the yardstick by which indie publishers measure themselves.  Indies have to strive to match and exceed the quality of traditionally published books, and that can only be a good thing for publishing as a whole.

 

Advice for aspiring writers?

 

Don’t do it!  But if you must, be prepared to eat really cheap food!

 

On a more serious note, I could spout the usual advice about perfecting your craft and getting used to rejection, but I’m not going to.   Everyone’s journey is different and it wouldn’t do for me to preach.  All I can do is share what helped me along on my journey.  The first thing was to get a good support network; I found this studying creative writing at university.  The people I met there are some of my closest friends today and I can always rely on them to give me a no-bull opinion on something I’m working on. Which leads me neatly to the fact that it was also at university where I really honed my craft.  I took notice of every word the tutors said, even when I was doubtful about it, and every word turned out to be useful somewhere along the line.  Even now, I never dismiss advice until I’ve evaluated it first, no matter how silly it initially sounds.  The other thing I did was to get involved in everything that came my way.  I got my first editing job after working unpaid for a publisher for two years, a job that I offered to do when the chief editor of the company came to visit our creative writing class.  When they needed a new fiction editor, I was already there; I knew their business, I had experience from the unpaid work I had been doing for them, so they gave the job to me. I worked for them for another few years as editor, and when they decided to branch out into young adult fiction, guess who was there with a manuscript in the bottom of her bag?  That manuscript just happens to be the book I have coming out in June.

 

What are you reading right now?

 

I happen to be reading a book by one Lindsay Leggett called Flight, which I’m loving. (You heard it here first, folks! ;))  I’m also reading something else as a beta reader so I’m not allowed to say what that is yet.  I recently finished The Night Circus, which was glorious.

 

About Sharon: 

sharon

Sharon Sant was born in Dorset but now lives in Stoke-on-Trent. She graduated from StaffordshireUniversity in 2009 with a degree in English and creative writing. She currently works part time as a freelance editor and continues to write her own stories. An avid reader with eclectic tastes across many genres, when not busy trying in vain to be a domestic goddess, she can often be found lurking in local coffee shops with her head in a book. Sometimes she pretends to be clever but really loves nothing more than watching geeky TV and eating Pringles.  Sky Song is her debut young adult novel. The second book of the Sky Song trilogy, The Young Moon, is due for release March 8th 2013.

About Sky Song

What the man told him was too incredible to believe, yet Jacob did believe it.  On some deep unconscious level he had always known it to be true. He was an invention, a fictional character.  Jacob Lightfoot didn’t exist.

A strange-eyed boy with no memory of his true identity or real parents, Jacob could have no idea of the mortal danger he has been in every day of his fifteen years. Now that danger has found him and suddenly he doesn’t know who he can trust and what is real anymore.  All he knows is that his new identity is almost as terrifying as the peril unleashing it has brought. Caught in the universal power struggle of an ancient race of beings and a destiny demanded of him that he does not want, he must fight to protect his own life and everyone he holds dear.

But when the time comes, will he be strong enough to make the sacrifices that saving them will demand?

 

www.sharonsant.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sharonjsant?ref=hl

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Get Sky Song:

 

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And keep an eye out for The Young Moon,  the next installment of the Sky Song Trilogy!